Aaj News - Feed http://aaj.tv Latest Breaking News from Pakistan Sun, 22 Oct 2017 12:03:14 +0500 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.1 Pakistan negotiating terms for purchase of T-129 attack helicopter from Turkey http://aaj.tv/2017/10/pakistan-negotiating-terms-for-purchase-of-t-129-attack-helicopter-from-turkey/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 12:03:14 +0500 nasir.wakeel http://aaj.tv/?p=392556

Pakistan negotiating terms for purchase of T-129 attack helicopter from Turkey

nasir.wakeel

Editors Pick

[caption id="attachment_389813" align="alignnone" width="800"] —Phot by Reuters[/caption] ANKARA: Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi says Turkish Defence production industry is one of the best in the world and second to none. He said this while talking to Pakistani and Turkish media after taking test-flight of Turkish attack helicopter T-129. The Prime Minister appreciated the Turkish aircraft and termed it impressive and good machine. He lauded the Turkish aviation industry as well as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for such achievements in the defence production. Answering a question about Pakistan's plan of purchasing T-129 helicopters, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi said, our army is evaluating the helicopter, and we are negotiating the contract and terms. The Prime Minister also inspected the helicopter, where he was briefed by the Turkish aviation officials about the specifications and technical parameters of the combat chopper. President and Chief Executive Officer of Turkish Aerospace Industries, Temel Kotil said that T-129 was a light weight attack helicopter equipped with missiles and guns. He said Pakistan and Turkey have strong defence ties and collaborating in the defence production area as well.—Radio Pakistan

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Buddhists protest to urge Myanmar not to repatriate Rohingya http://aaj.tv/2017/10/buddhists-protest-to-urge-myanmar-not-to-repatriate-rohingya/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:58:52 +0500 nasir.wakeel http://aaj.tv/?p=392554

Buddhists protest to urge Myanmar not to repatriate Rohingya

nasir.wakeel

Latest

[caption id="attachment_392555" align="alignnone" width="800"] —Photo by AP[/caption] SITTWE, Myanmar: Hundreds of hard-line Buddhists protested Sunday to urge Myanmar's government not to repatriate the nearly 600,000 minority Rohingya Muslims who have fled to Bangladesh since late August to escape violence in Myanmar's Rakhine state. The protest took place in Sittwe, the state capital, where many Rohingya lived before an outbreak of inter-communal violence in 2012 forced them to flee their homes. Aung Htay, a protest organizer, said any citizens would be welcome in the state. "But if these people don't have the right to be citizens ... the government's plan for a conflict-free zone will never be implemented," he said. Myanmar doesn't recognize Rohingya as an ethnic group, instead insisting they are Bengali migrants from Bangladesh living illegally in the country. Rohingya are excluded from the official 135 ethnic groups in the country and denied citizenship. More than 580,000 Rohingya from northern Rakhine have fled to Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when Myanmar security forces began a scorched-earth campaign against Rohingya villages. Myanmar's government has said it was responding to attacks by Muslim insurgents, but the United Nations and others have said the response was disproportionate. Myanmar de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi's government said earlier this month that it was willing to take back Rohingya refugees who fled to southeastern Bangladesh. The government has agreed to form a joint working group to start the repatriation process. On Sunday, protesters, including some Buddhist monks, demanded that the government not take back the refugees. "The organizers of the protest applied to get permission for a thousand people to participate in the protest, but only a few hundred showed up," said Soe Tint Swe, a local official.—AP

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US-allied force takes Syria’s largest oil field from IS http://aaj.tv/2017/10/us-allied-force-takes-syrias-largest-oil-field-from-is/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:55:27 +0500 nasir.wakeel http://aaj.tv/?p=392549

US-allied force takes Syria’s largest oil field from IS

nasir.wakeel

Latest

[caption id="attachment_392553" align="alignnone" width="800"] —Photo by AP[/caption] BEIRUT: U.S-allied fighters said they captured Syria's largest oil field from the Islamic State group on Sunday, marking a major advance against the extremists and seizing an area coveted by pro-government forces. With IS in retreat across Syria and neighboring Iraq, the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces and the Syrian government have been in a race to secure parts of the oil-rich Deir el-Zour province along the border. The SDF, with air support from the U.S.-led coalition, said Sunday it captured the Al-Omar field in a "swift and wide military operation." It said some militants have taken cover in oil company houses nearby, where clashes are underway. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said pro-government forces retreated from the area around Al-Omar field after coming under heavy fire from IS. The SDF said government forces are three kilometers (two miles) away from the fields. Syrian troops, backed by Russian warplanes and Iranian-sponsored militias, have retaken nearly all of the provincial capital of Deir el-Zour, as well as the town of Mayadeen, which is across the Euphrates River from the Al-Omar field. The SDF have focused their operations on the eastern side of the river, and have already seized a major natural gas field and other smaller oil fields. Omar Abu Layla, a Europe-based activist from Deir el-Zour who monitors the fighting through contacts there, said SDF forces have entered the field but are still clashing with militants in the adjacent houses. IS captured Al-Omar in 2014, when the group swept across large areas in Syria and neighboring Iraq. The field was estimated to produce around 9,000 barrels a day, making it a key source of revenue for the extremists. Its current potential is unknown, following a series of strikes on IS-held oil facilities by the U.S.-led coalition. The government lost the al-Omar field to other insurgents in 2013. Al-Manar TV, operated by Lebanon's Hezbollah, said the fight for Al-Omar was still underway and denied the SDF's claim to have captured it. The militant group is fighting alongside Syrian President Bashar Assad's forces. IS has suffered a series of major setbacks in recent months, including the loss of the Syrian city of Raqqa, once the extremists' self-styled capital, and the Iraqi city of Mosul. Most of the territory the group once held has been seized by an array of Syrian and Iraqi forces.—AP

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Taliban strikes on Afghan bases a ‘show of strength’ against Trump http://aaj.tv/2017/10/taliban-strikes-on-afghan-bases-a-show-of-strength-against-trump/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:51:22 +0500 bilal ahmed http://aaj.tv/?p=392542

Taliban strikes on Afghan bases a ‘show of strength’ against Trump

bilal ahmed

Latest

[caption id="attachment_388552" align="alignleft" width="800"] —File Photo[/caption] KABUL: A spate of deadly Taliban attacks targeting Afghan forces this week was a show of strength against Donald Trump's new strategy, and signalled a push to strike security bases rather than cities, analysts said. In three of the four ambushes since Tuesday, militants used bomb-laden Humvees to blast their way into targets, seeking to demoralise war-weary security forces, and steal weapons and vehicles to fuel their insurgency. It marks a change in focus from recent years when the Taliban fought to control and hold provincial capitals, such as the northern city of Kunduz, which briefly fell to the militants twice in the past 24 months. "(The Taliban) want to be showing their potency after the summer unveiling of the Trump policy of staying on with larger forces," said Vanda Felbab-Brown, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. "They haven't tried to hold provincial capitals... they are not wasting their assets on that." Militants have launched several devastating assaults on security forces already this year, including an attack on a base in northern Mazar-i-Sharif in the spring in which at least 144 people were killed. But this week stands apart for the number of attacks in such a short time -- five in as many days with an overall death toll of around 150 people -- and coming after the US and Afghan forces have stepped up their own offensives. In August, Trump announced that American forces would stay in Afghanistan indefinitely, increasing attacks on insurgents and deploying more troops. Following his announcement the US has dramatically ramped up airstrikes, with more bombs and missiles dropped in September than in any month since October 2010. A recent flurry of drone strikes in the lawless region near the border with Pakistan's tribal areas has also seen dozens of militants killed. This week's attacks are the Taliban's response, a spokesman told AFP, calling it "a clear message... The enemy who thought they had scared us with the new Trump strategy have now been given a lesson". The attacks also came after talks between Afghanistan, Pakistan, the United States and China at the start of the week seeking ways to end the Taliban's 16-year insurgency. "I think the Taliban wanted to send a very strong message that it prefers to fight rather than talk and that it has the ability to fight very well," said analyst Michael Kugelman, of the Wilson Center in Washington.  Loss of morale The message has proved devastating: hundreds killed and wounded over a bloody few days that left military bases and police headquarters destroyed or severely damaged. The deadliest attack was on a police compound in the city of Gardez, where Taliban militants detonated three explosive-packed vehicles including a Humvee. At least 60 people were killed in the blasts and ensuing battle, officials said. The militants also attacked a police headquarters in Ghazni twice, and detonated a suicide bomb on Afghan police trainees in Kabul that killed 15. Attacking security targets kills three birds with one stone: it allows the Taliban to deflect criticism over civilian casualties, devastate Afghan forces, and steal equipment. The Taliban has acquired "dozens" of armoured Humvees and pickup trucks in recent years, defence ministry deputy spokesman Mohammad Radmanesh told AFP. "The Humvees and other military vehicles are stronger than ordinary ones and you can load a lot of explosives in it," General Abdul Wahid Taqat, a former intelligence chief, told AFP. "I would think that could be pretty demoralising for Afghan forces knowing that their own weaponry is being used against them by the enemy," Kugelman said. Such erosion of morale can be lethal, as officials have previously pointed out. Afghan forces, already beset by desertions and corruption, have seen casualties soar to what a US watchdog has described as "shockingly high" levels since NATO forces officially ended their combat mission in 2014. Morale is further eroded by long-running fears the militants have insider help -- everything from insurgents in the ranks to corrupt Afghan forces selling equipment to the Taliban, said retired Afghan army general Atiqullah Amarkhail.  'Offensive mode' The question of how to ward off such guerilla attacks is one that officials have not yet been able to fully answer. One security source who spoke anonymously to AFP said Afghan forces should "come out of their bases and choose offensive mode", warning that areas patrolled by police at night are safer than places the army is deployed. Felbab-Brown said strengthening checkpoints and improved information sharing would also help. For Kandahar's police chief General Abdul Raziq, more and faster airstrikes would put a quick end to hours-long assaults such as the one in Gardez this week. "The Afghan air force should be equipped as soon as possible," he said. Raziq said the week's attacks were not a response to Trump but the militants lashing out after failing to achieve their goals during the summer fighting season. The Taliban have already threatened more attacks, and Raziq called for swift action. "Instead of being concerned, we have to take necessary measures," he warned.—AFP

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Arthur praises Pakistan player over spot fixing case http://aaj.tv/2017/10/arthur-praises-pakistan-player-over-spot-fixing-case/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:36:56 +0500 Afshan Zahra http://aaj.tv/?p=392544

Arthur praises Pakistan player over spot fixing case

Afshan Zahra

Cricket

[caption id="attachment_392547" align="alignleft" width="800"] —File Photo[/caption] SHARJAH, United Arab Emirates: Pakistan head coach Mickey Arthur on Sunday praised an unnamed player for reporting a spot fixing approach as "a real example to our team". Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) Saturday confirmed a player was approached with a fixing offer during the ongoing one-day series with Sri Lanka but he reported the matter to the Board's anti-corruption unit. Pakistani media named the player as skipper Sarfraz Ahmed. "To be honest the player reacted unbelievably well," Arthur told media at Sharjah stadium. "He did everything required of him and we had a chat straight afterwards. "It was handled brilliantly and I think that is a real example to our team and to the cricket world that a really important player was approached and acted to the letter of the law and did exceptionally well as a true ambassador of the game." PCB said the matter was also referred to the International Cricket Council. Arthur was confident any of his players would act in the same manner in future. "I am very comfortable with our players, they are outstanding and they are intelligent young men and individuals and I have no doubt that if anyone is approached they will do the same way as the individua did," said Arthur. As per the anti-corruption rules a player is required to instantly report a fixing offer, failing to which will result in a minimum of six months to a maximum life ban. Pakistan cricket received a jolt in February when two of theirplayers -- Sharjeel Khan and Khalid Latif -- were caught in a spot-fixing scandal which rocked their Twenty20 league held in United Arab Emirates. Sharjeel was banned for five years (two and a half years of which were suspended) while Khalid was banned for five years and fined one million rupees ($10,000). The two played for Islamabad United in the Pakistan Super League (PSL) and were accused of arranging two dot balls in return for money in the opening match of the league. Pacer Mohammad Irfan was banned for one year, six months of which were suspended, and fined one million rupees while spinning all-rounder Mohammad Nawaz was banned for two months (one suspended) and fined 200,000 rupees ($2,000) for failing to report fixing offers at various stages.—AFP

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Tillerson attends landmark Saudi, Iraq meeting http://aaj.tv/2017/10/tillerson-attends-landmark-saudi-iraq-meeting/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:35:49 +0500 nasir.wakeel http://aaj.tv/?p=392546

Tillerson attends landmark Saudi, Iraq meeting

nasir.wakeel

Editors Pick

[caption id="attachment_392548" align="alignnone" width="800"] —Photo by AFP[/caption] RIYADH: Top US diplomat Rex Tillerson attended a landmark meeting Sunday between Saudi Arabia and Iraq aimed at upgrading strategic ties between the two countries and countering Iran's regional influence. Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi and Saudi King Salman held the first meeting of the joint Saudi-Iraqi coordination council that aims to boost cooperation after years of tensions. Abadi hailed the meeting as an "important step toward enhancing relations", echoing similar comments from King Salman. "We are facing in our region serious challenges in the form of extremism, terrorism as well as attempts to destabilise our countries," the Saudi monarch said. "These attempts require our full attention." Iraq is seeking economic benefits from closer ties with Riyadh as both countries suffer from a protracted oil slump. Saudi Arabia is also seeking to counter Iranian influence in Iraq. "This event highlights the strength and breadth as well as the great potential of the relations between your countries," Tillerson said, referring to the meeting. After years of tense relations, ties between Sunni-ruled Saudi Arabia and Shiite-majority Iraq have begun looking up in recent months. After former dictator Saddam Hussein's August 1990 invasion of Kuwait, Riyadh severed relations with Baghdad and closed its border posts with its northern neighbour. Ties remained strained even after Saddam's ouster in the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq, since when successive Shiite-dominated governments in Baghdad have stayed close to Tehran. But a flurry of visits between the two countries this year appears to indicate a thawing of ties. Abadi's tour coincides with Saudi Energy Minister Khaled al-Faleh's high profile visit to Baghdad on Saturday where he called for the strengthening of economic relations to boost oil prices. At the opening of the Baghdad International Fair, Falih hailed what he called "the new Iraq, on the ambitious road to prosperity and growth while strengthening its relations with the world".—AFP

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Abe sweeps to big win in Japan vote http://aaj.tv/2017/10/abe-sweeps-to-big-win-in-japan-vote/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 11:32:55 +0500 nasir.wakeel http://aaj.tv/?p=392543

Abe sweeps to big win in Japan vote

nasir.wakeel

Latest

[caption id="attachment_392545" align="alignnone" width="800"] —Photo by Reuters[/caption] TOKYO: Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe swept to a comfortable victory in a snap election Sunday, handing him a mandate to harden his already hawkish stance on North Korea and re-energise the world's number-three economy. Abe's conservative coalition was on track to win 311 seats in the 465-seat parliament, according to a projection published by private broadcaster TBS, putting the nationalist blue blood on course to become Japan's longest-serving leader. The comfortable election win is likely to stiffen Abe's resolve to tackle North Korea's nuclear menace, as the key US regional ally seeks to exert maximum pressure on the regime in Pyongyang after it fired two missiles over Japan in the space of a month. Abe was heading for a "landslide win," the Yomiuri daily said on its website. Millions of Japanese braved torrential rain and driving winds to vote, as a typhoon bears down on the country with many heeding warnings to cast their ballots early. "I support Abe's stance not to give in to North Korea's pressure," said one voter, Yoshihisa Iemori, as he cast his ballot in rain-swept Tokyo. Abe's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) benefitted from a weak and splintered opposition, with the two main parties facing him created only a matter of weeks ago. Support for the Party of Hope founded by popular Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike fizzled after an initial blaze of publicity and was on track to win around 50 seats, the TBS projection suggested. Speaking from Paris where she was attending an event in her capacity as leader of the world's biggest city, a sullen-faced Koike told public broadcaster NHK she feared a "very severe result". The new centre-left Constitutional Democratic Party fared slightly better than expected but was still far behind Abe. "The LDP's victory is simply because the opposition couldn't form a united front," political scientist Mikitaka Masuyama from the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, told AFP. It was unclear in the immediate aftermath of the vote whether Abe's coalition would retain its two-thirds "supermajority." Such a "supermajority" would allow Abe to propose changes to Japan's US-imposed constitution that forces it to "renounce" war and effectively limits its military to a self-defence role. - 'Sink' Japan - The short 12-day campaign was dominated by the economy and the global crisis over North Korea, which has threatened to "sink" Japan into the sea. Nationalist Abe stuck to a hardline stance throughout, stressing that Japan "would not waver" in the face of an increasingly belligerent regime in Pyongyang. Despite the sabre-rattling from North Korea, many voters said reviving the once-mighty Japanese economy was the top priority, with Abe's trademark "Abenomics" policy failing to trickle down to the general public. The three-pronged combination of ultra-loose monetary policy, huge government spending and structural reform has catapulted the stock market to a 21-year high but failed to stoke inflation and growth has remained sluggish. "Neither pensions nor wages are getting better ... I don't feel the economy is recovering at all," said 67-year-old pensioner Hideki Kawasaki. Although voters turned out in their millions to back Abe, support for the 63-year-old is lukewarm and surveys showed his decision to call a snap election a year earlier than expected was unpopular. Voter Etsuko Nakajima, 84, told AFP: "I totally oppose the current government. Morals collapsed. I'm afraid this country will be broken." "I think if the LDP takes power, Japan will be in danger. He does not do politics for the people," added the pensioner. Koike briefly promised to shake up Japan's sleepy political scene with her new party but she declined to run herself for a seat, sparking confusion over who would be prime minister if she won. In the end, the 65-year-old former TV presenter was not even in Japan on election day. "I thought that I would vote for the Party of Hope if it's strong enough to beat the Abe administration. But the party has been in confusion ... I'm quite disappointed," said 80-year-old pensioner Kumiko Fujimori. The campaign was marked by a near-constant drizzle in large parts of the country and rallies frequently took place under shelter and a sea of umbrellas. But this did not dampen the enthusiasm of hundreds of doughty, sash-wearing parliamentary hopefuls, who have driven around in minibuses pleading for votes via loudspeaker and bowing deeply to every potential voter.—AFP

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Mystery ‘braid-chopping’ cases add panic to trauma in Kashmir http://aaj.tv/2017/10/mystery-braid-chopping-cases-add-panic-to-trauma-in-kashmir/ Sun, 22 Oct 2017 07:03:00 +0500 bilal ahmed http://aaj.tv/?p=392540

Mystery ‘braid-chopping’ cases add panic to trauma in Kashmir

bilal ahmed

Editors Pick

[caption id="attachment_392541" align="alignnone" width="800"] .— AFP photo[/caption] SRINAGAR: A wave of brutal, deadly panic has swept Indian-administered Kashmir after more than 100 women said they were victims of attackers who chopped off their hair. Despite suggestions the cases may have been fabricated or fuelled by hysteria, the consequences have been all too real. One 70-year-old man has been killed by vigilantes since the alleged incidents started a month ago, and there are near-daily reports of groups attacking suspected so-called "braid-choppers". Authorities have avoided confirming or denying the accounts of women from across the Himalayan region, which bears deep mental scars from a decades-old uprising against Indian rule. Groups armed with iron rods and knives patrol the capital Srinagar and other towns after dark looking for suspects. Five people were wounded Wednesday when Indian soldiers opened fire on a stone-throwing crowd who thought troops were protecting a braid-chopper. On Friday, police said they rescued a "mentally challenged" man accused by a mob that was trying to set him ablaze and run him over with a tractor. At least a dozen police and soldiers have been beaten up. Police initially said the hair-chopping was self-inflicted. Now they are offering a 600,000 rupee ($9,250) reward for information leading to the capture of suspects, but they also want the victims to take lie-detector tests. In Muslim-majority Kashmir most women have long hair kept under a scarf when in public. The details of the alleged attacks are often mysterious and difficult to verify, while witnesses are hard to find. Tasleema told how she was going to fetch vegetables in storage when she was attacked. Her husband, Mohammad Rauf Wani, heard a scream and found his wife unconscious on the floor with six inches of her hair spread out next to her. "I don't understand how it happened," Wani told AFP, holding his wife's severed braid. "Just as I turned after opening the door someone tried to strangle me from behind. I saw his face covered by a black mask, I saw his eyes. Then I don't know what happened," Tasleema told AFP.  Void increases panic Most of the women were alone and have told relatives they suspect a spray was used to knock them unconscious before their braids were cut. Most were under 18 and come from poor families, according to police. In a region where any incident can become highly politicised, the vigilantes have seized on the void created by the lack of an official explanation or the arrest of suspects. Videos of angry relatives accusing police and soldiers while brandishing cut braids have been widely shared on social media. Doctors at Kashmir's only psychiatric hospital said they have not been called in to study the cases. "Some people are making it out as mass hysteria, but in my experience, given the manner in which it is happening I don't think this is so," said Mohammad Maqbool Dar, head of psychiatry at Srinagar's government medical college. He said it was possible there were "odd cases" of hysteria. Senior police worry that the hair-chopping allegations could cause wider unrest in the region. According to a 2015 study by the Doctors Without Borders (MSF) group, about 1.8 million adults -- 45 percent of Kashmir's adult population, and mostly women -- suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health problems. Outside Tasleema's house, scores of residents protested, shouting anti-government and anti-police slogans after news spread of her braid-chopping. Some residents accuse police of staging hair-chopping as psychological operations -- or "psy-ops" -- to prevent political protests. "We have so much human intelligence that I don't need any psy-ops," Kashmir's inspector general of police, Munir Ahmed Khan, told AFP. Similar braid-cutting assaults were reported in the northern Indian states of Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and around New Delhi in July. Authorities there treated the incidents as crimes but brought in psychiatrists as well to investigate. "Here the situation is different," police chief Khan said. "There are forces who will exploit it (braid-chopping) to the hilt. Pakistan will use this situation, that is my worry," Khan said. The under-pressure Kashmir government says only that the "motives behind these attacks" are being investigated. Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti said in recent Twitter comments that braid-chopping was an attempt "to create mass hysteria and undermine the dignity of the women in the state."

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Fifteen Afghan army trainees killed in Kabul suicide attack http://aaj.tv/2017/10/fifteen-afghan-army-trainees-killed-in-kabul-suicide-attack/ Sat, 21 Oct 2017 13:41:33 +0500 bilal ahmed http://aaj.tv/?p=392537

Fifteen Afghan army trainees killed in Kabul suicide attack

bilal ahmed

Editors Pick

  [caption id="attachment_392538" align="alignnone" width="800"] .— File photo[/caption] KABUL: A suicide bomber killed 15 Afghan army trainees as they were leaving their base in Kabul on Saturday, the defence ministry said, in the latest deadly attack in the capital. "This afternoon when a minibus carrying army cadets was coming out of the military academy, a suicide bomber on foot targeted them, martyring 15 and wounding four," defence ministry spokesman Dawlat Waziri told AFP. Kabul Crime Branch chief General Mohammad Salim Almas said police have launched an investigation into the attack which happened in the west of the city. "The minibus was carrying army trainees to their homes from Marshal Fahim military academy," Almas told AFP. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack. It was the second suicide bombing in the Afghan capital in 24 hours and the seventh major assault in Afghanistan since Tuesday, taking the total death toll to more than 200, with hundreds more wounded. The spate of deadly attacks underscores deteriorating security across the war-torn country as the resurgent Taliban step up their attacks on police and military bases and Islamic State continue to target Shiite mosques. It was the fifth time since Tuesday that militants have launched a major attack against Afghanistan's beleaguered security forces already badly demoralised by high casualties and desertions. In the deadliest of the recent attacks, around 50 Afghan soldiers were killed in a Taliban-claimed assault on a military base in the southern province of Kandahar. Insurgents blasted their way into the compound using two explosives-laden Humvees -- a tactic used in three separate attacks this week -- officials said. The militants razed the base in the Chashmo area of Maiwand district to the ground, according to the defence ministry. Afghan security forces have faced soaring casualties in their attempts to hold back the insurgents since NATO combat forces pulled out of the country at the end of 2014.

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Pakistan confirm bookie’s approach to a player http://aaj.tv/2017/10/pakistan-confirm-bookies-approach-to-a-player/ Sat, 21 Oct 2017 13:37:09 +0500 bilal ahmed http://aaj.tv/?p=392536

Pakistan confirm bookie’s approach to a player

bilal ahmed

Cricket

[caption id="attachment_359565" align="alignnone" width="800"] - File photo[/caption] SHARJAH:  A top Pakistan cricket official Saturday confirmed a national team player was approached by a bookie with an offer of fixing which was reported to the anti-corruption unit. Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) chairman Najam Sethi said the matter was being dealt with by his board and the International Cricket Council (ICC). "A player was approached," Sethi said on Twitter. "As per rules he immediately reported to PCB who informed ICC. Matters are jointly in hand. No further comment." Pakistani media said the player approached was skipper Sarfraz Ahmed and it happened on October 17 before the third one-day international in Abu Dhabi a day later. Reports said Ahmed had immediately reported the matter to PCB's anti-corruption unit, who in turn informed the ICC. Under the anti-corruption code a player must report a fixing offer and failure to do so can result in a ban of a minimum of six months. The maximum punishment is a life ban. Pakistan lead the five-match series 4-0 after a thumping seven-wicket win against Sri Lanka in Sharjah on Friday. The final match takes place in Sharjah on Monday. Under ICC rules a player is interviewed by its anti-corruption unit to further investigate the matter, but the governing body does not make any comment on an ongoing investigation. Pakistan cricket received a jolt in February when two of its players -- Sharjeel Khan and Khalid Latif -- were caught in a spot-fixing scandal which rocked their Twenty20 league held in United Arab Emirates. Sharjeel was banned for five years (two and a half years of which were suspended) while Khalid was banned for five years and fined one million rupees ($10,000). The two played for Islamabad United in the Pakistan Super League (PSL) and were accused of arranging two dot balls in return for money in the opening match of the league. Pacer Mohammad Irfan was banned for one year, six months of which were suspended, and fined one million rupees while spinning all-rounder Mohammad Nawaz was banned for two months (one suspended) and fined 200,000 rupess ($2,000) for failing to report fixing offers at various stages.

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