Jaw dropping highlights about Malala Yousafzai’s incredible life

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Web Desk: Malala Yousafzai doesn’t need any introduction. She is one of the most accomplished and the most celebrated people in the world. She has won the Nobel Peace Prize, traveled all over the world, authored two books and started Studying at Oxford.

Here are some of the highlights of Yousafzai’s incredible life.

Malala Yousafzai is 20 years old, Pakistani activist, an author and the youngest recipient of Nobel Peace Prize.

Malala Yousafzai is 20 years old. She is a Pakistani activist, an author, and the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 2017, she started studying at Oxford University. She will study philosophy, politics and economics.

Yousafzai began studying at Oxford University in October 2017. She will study philosophy, politics, and economics.

 In 2007, she defied the ban preventing women from attending school.

Yousafzai grew up in the Swat Valley in Northwest Pakistan. The Taliban took control of the area in 2007. She defied the ban preventing women from attending school: "I just could not imagine a life limited to the four walls of my house and never be myself."

She was shot by a member of the Taliban. A bullet narrowly missed her brain.

In 2012, Malala was 14 when she was shot by a member of the Taliban. A bullet narrowly missed her brain.

In 2013, she along with her father set up the Malala Fund to give girls access to education.

In 2013, Yousafzai and her father, Ziauddin, established the Malala Fund to give girls all over the world access to education.

She published a memoir titled ‘I Am Malala’ in 2013.

That same year, Yousafzai published a memoir titled "I Am Malala," co-written with Christina Lamb.

She shocked Jin Steward by explaining what she would say to Taliban come after again. She said, ‘I will tell him how important education is and that I even want education for your children as well.’

She appeared on The Daily Show and left Jon Stewart speechless when she explained what she would do should someone from the Taliban come after her again: "I will tell him how important education is and that I even want education for your children as well. And I would tell him, 'That's what I want to tell you. Now do what you want.'"

She met President Barack Obama and challenged him on the drone strikes in Pakistan.

Yousafzai met with President Barack Obama and challenged him on the drone strikes in Pakistan: "Innocent victims are killed in these acts, and they lead to resentment among the Pakistani people. If we refocus efforts on education it will make a big impact."

In 2014, she didn’t owned cell phone or used social media, so she could focus on her education. She does have Twitter account.

In 2014, Yousafzai became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. She said the award was also "for those frightened children who want peace. It is for those voiceless children who want change."

Recently, she published a children’s book titled, ‘Malala’s Magic Pencil’. She said for kids, ‘They should dream beyond limits and believe that there is magic in them.’

Yousafzai recently published a children's book titled "Malala's Magic Pencil." "The magic is in their voice, in their words, in their writings," she said of the kids who read her book. "They should dream beyond limits and believe that there is magic in them."

In April, she went on a ‘Girl Power Trip’ to meet with women around the world and was designed a UN Messenger of Peace.

In April, Yousafzai went on a "Girl Power Trip" to meet with women around the world and was designated a UN Messenger of Peace. After winning the award, Yousafzai told the audience that the most difficult period of her life was between 2007 and 2009 in the Swat valley: "We were at a point of making a decision about whether to speak out or remain silent. And I realized that if you remain silent, you are still going to be terrorized. So speaking out, you can help people."

Source: Business Insider

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