Picture Gallery: The Zika Babies


WEB DESK: Zika – a mosquito-borne virus first detected in the Americas last year –is linked to wave of brain damage in newborns. There is no vaccine or known cure for the poorly understood disease.

In most cases, Zika causes no noticeable symptoms so women have no idea if they contracted it during pregnancy.

The virus has been linked to the devastating birth defect microcephaly, which prevents fetus’ brains from developing properly.

The World Health Organization has said as many as 4 million people in the Americas may become infected.

 

Geovane Silva holds his son Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Geovane Silva holds his son Gustavo Henrique, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sueli Maria (obscured) holds her seven-day-old daughter Milena, who has microcephaly, at a hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. Health authorities in the Brazilian state at the center of a rapidly spreading Zika outbreak have been overwhelmed by the alarming surge in cases of babies born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder associated with the mosquito-borne virus. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Sueli Maria (obscured) holds her seven-day-old daughter Milena, who has microcephaly, at a hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. Health authorities in the Brazilian state at the center of a rapidly spreading Zika outbreak have been overwhelmed by the alarming surge in cases of babies born with microcephaly, a neurological disorder associated with the mosquito-borne virus. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Maria Clara (L) and Camile Vitoria pose for picture with their brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Maria Clara (L) and Camile Vitoria pose for picture with their brother Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Felipe holds the head of his daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, at his house in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Felipe holds the head of his daughter Maria Geovana, who has microcephaly, at his house in Recife, Brazil, January 25, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. TREUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Daniele Ferreira holds her son Juan Pedro during a session to stimulate the development of his eyesight at the Altino Ventura rehabilitation center in Recife, Brazil, January 28, 2016. TREUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, has his head measured by a neurologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, has his head measured by a neurologist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Mothers with their children, who have microcephaly, await medical care at the Hospital Oswaldo Cruz, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Mothers with their children, who have microcephaly, await medical care at the Hospital Oswaldo Cruz, in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Oswaldo Cruz Hospital staff prepare to draw blood from baby Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016.  REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Oswaldo Cruz Hospital staff prepare to draw blood from baby Ludmilla Hadassah Dias de Vasconcelos, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Rain Gomes waits for medical care with her son Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Rain Gomes waits for medical care with her son Alessandro Gomes, who has microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil, January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Hilda Venancio bathes her son Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Hilda Venancio bathes her son Matheus, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil, January 27, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

loading...
loading...